Social Media is a “Slot Machine” in Your Phone

According to Dr. Cal Newport associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University, social media designers look to addictive activities such as gambling and the tactics used in the gamble haven Las Vegas when creating and updating social media sites and applications.

Per the Georgetown professor, spending large portions of your day in a state of fragmented attention, taking quick glances at social media such as Instagram and Facebook, can permanently reduce your capacity for concentration.

There have also been numerous studies that prove social media can cause psychological harm.

• The more use of social media the more likely you’ll feel lonely

• Exposure to your friends’ constantly curated positive portrayals of their life can leave you to feel inadequate and can increase rates of depression

• The fundamental mismatch between the way our brains are wired and this behavior of exposing yourself to stimuli with intermittent rewards during all waking hours has cognitive consequences such as a pervasive constant hum of anxiety
Chamath Palihapitiya, former vice-president for user growth at Facebook, says: “The short-term, dopamine-driven feedback loops that we have created are destroying how society works. No civil discourse, no cooperation, misinformation, mistruth.”

“I can’t control them,” Palihapitiya said of his former employer. “I can control my decision, which is that I don’t use that shit. I can control my kids’ decisions, which is that they’re not allowed to use that shit.”

Furthermore, Facebook’s founding president, Sean Parker, criticized the way that the company “exploit[s] a vulnerability in human psychology” by creating a “social-validation feedback loop” during an interview at an Axios event.

If you have not done so already, Palihapitiya urges people to “soul-search” about their own relationship to social media. “Your behaviors, you don’t realize it, but you are being programmed,” he said. “It was unintentional, but now you gotta decide how much you’re going to give up, how much of your intellectual independence.”

50 Year Old Graciously Sheds Light on What She Wishes Someone Told Her in Her 20’s

  1. Be kind. The benefits of being kind—or at the very least courteous—far outweigh the effort you put in. Do random acts of kindness. Compliment someone. If a retail or food-service worker makes a mistake, be understanding and patient. Kind people live longer than unkind people.
  2. I know myself better than anyone else. I don’t let anyone else’s opinions control what I do, what I wear, or what I say. Other people’s opinions are suggestions—take them or leave them.
  3. Everyone else is as worried and insecure as you are. Some people just hide it better. It doesn’t mean that they are any smarter or better than you.
  4. Laugh it off. If you make a mistake, fall down, or do something dumb, just laugh it off. Other people (and you) will forget it a lot faster if you just let it roll off your back. EVERYONE makes dumb mistakes. Everyone. You aren’t alone, and you aren’t the biggest idiot in the world. Give yourself a break.
  5. “Fitting in” is highly overrated. Be you. Confidence is sexy. Besides, great leaders didn’t get where they are by following the crowd.
  6. Don’t stay in a bad relationship, even if it’s “for the kids.” Oftentimes, kids really thrive outside the bounds of a toxic relationship.
  7. It’s just stuff. Sure, stuff gets broken—oftentimes accidentally by people you love—and that’s annoying. But your stuff can be replaced. You can never erase the hurtful words you say to the person you love, because they broke your stuff. Stuff is never, ever as important as those you love.
  8. You’re probably a lot smarter than you give yourself credit for being.
  9. Don’t judge. You don’t know all the facts. That lady speeding down the road with her toddler unbuckled in the back seat may be panicked, heading for the hospital for an emergency that you can’t see. That “big kid” having a “tantrum” in the store may be on the autism spectrum, and is having a melt down, which he/she hates as much as you do. The fat lady in the bikini may have lost 100 lbs so far, and she’s pretty darn proud of what she’s done. Don’t shame people for smoking, drinking, or being fat. We all have our faults and bad habits. As a pretty famous guy is alleged to have said, “let he who is without sin cast the first stone.”
  10. Never lose your inner child. Dance. Sing. Skip. Tell poop jokes (not to strangers, though). Go down the slide. Bounce at the bouncy house, if the attendant says adults are welcome. This is an advantage to being older. When you’re 20, people often think you’re “too old” to do these things, but when a 50-something does them, it’s charming. And if people think it’s dumb, screw them. See #2 above.
  11. Don’t make major life decisions to please other people. Maybe your parents expect you to go to college, but you just want to go to trade school and become an auto mechanic, because that’s where your heart is. Or maybe (as in my case) your parents don’t want you to go to college, but you really want to be an attorney. Live life for YOU. The world needs good auto mechanics and good attorneys. It’ll all work out.
  12. Don’t beat yourself up about stuff. Do what you can to fix your mistakes, then move on. Guilt is only good for pushing you toward making things right again. After that, it becomes shame, and shame is a toxic substance which will eat you up inside. Same for worry.
  13. Enjoy life. Literally, stop to smell and admire the flowers. Wonder. Smile at strangers and see how many you can get to smile back. Have fun.
  14. Life goes by really, really fast. Live each day so that, at the end, you’re reveling in how amazing your life was, not regretting
  15. all the things you did or didn’t do.
  16. Life is better after 50.

Original article can be found here.

Everything in the Pantry Vegetables

Cut all vegetables in a bite size add your favorite oil and a little bit of balsamic vinegrette.

Here I used the following ingredients:







Red peppers

3 tablespoons of Safflower oil

3 tablespoons of Balsamic vinegrette

Cook in the oven on bake at 425° F for 30-45 minutes stirring every 15 mins or so until potatoes are cooked (since potatoes take the longest).

Seperate in your meal prep containers or serve them right away as a scrumptious side dish!